“Smoke ’em if you got ’em.” Recreational marijuana is officially legal today in Michigan. However, there are a host of budding issues that employers and employees must address with this legalization.

For background, Michigan voted in November to legalize recreational use of marijuana by adults who are 21 or older. About ten years earlier, Michigan

Workplace drug testingAre Michigan employers at risk of being sued for violating rights of individuals who are authorized medical marijuana users? A case from Connecticut under that state’s law suggest the answer may be yes.

Specifically, a Connecticut federal court found an employer guilty of employment discrimination after it refused to hire a medical marijuana user.

The

Employee Medical MarijuanaToday is April 20, 2015. However, for certain individuals who partake in smoking a plant in the cannabis genus, it is also “420.” The use of “420” has historically been a shorthand reference to recreational marijuana smoking. However, as more states enact laws legalizing marijuana use for medical conditions, employers may need to reassess their

YellowQuestionMark.jpgThe Detroit Free Press (by Dawson Bell) reported that Michigan’s Attorney General, Bill Schuette, and a coalition of lawmakers and prosecutors are calling Michigan’s medical marijuana law so poorly drafted as to be unworkable.

The focus of this criticism in large part is on the legality of medical marijuana dispensaries, the definition of a

Marijuana Leaf.jpgRecently a Michigan federal court judge dismissed a case brought by a former Wal-Mart employee of five years and associate of the year in 2008, after he was terminated when a drug test was positive for marihuana. (Reported by Larry Gabriel of the Metrotimes). Mr. Casias had previously registered under Michigan’s statute to

Medical Marijuana.jpgThe Detroit Free Press reported on April 21, 2011 (by Dawson Bell and John Wisely) that approximately 63,735 Michigan residents had registered to use marihuana for medical purposes under Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Law (Michigan spells marihuana with an “h”, rather than a “j”). There is also over a five-month backlog in issuing registration cards. 

Based on the