LGBT Discrimination The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to hear a trio of cases involving the protection of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees from discrimination in the workplace. The Court’s decision will likely eliminate or clarify what protections LGBT employees have under Title VII.

Michigan Employer Fires Transgender Employee

In 2016, we covered one of

IC AgreementMany businesses owners (wrongly) assume they can limit their company’s liability for employment discrimination claims by entering into an independent contractor agreement. But that is not always true as shown by a recent Michigan Court of Appeals decision. Specifically, this decision provides a reminder that companies must focus on compliance with employment laws for its

Wage discriminationMichigan municipalities won’t be able to enact local legislation championed as one way to eliminate the wage gap between men and women under a bill heading to Gov. Rick Snyder.

Specifically, legislation (SB No. 353) restricts municipalities from regulating what information employers must request, require or exclude during job interviews passed the Republican-controlled

Sincere Religious BeliefsHow far does an employer have to go to accommodate an employee’s religious beliefs? That is an issue raised in a lawsuit filed by the EEOC against Memorial Healthcare on February 13 (EEOC v Memorial Healthcare).

The suit claims the Michigan hospital failed to reasonably accommodate Yvonne Bair’s religious practices when it rescinded

Discrimination against overweight employeesCompanies employing individuals in Michigan are often surprised to learn Michigan law specifically prohibits weight discrimination.

Specifically, Michigan’s anti-discrimination statute, the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act (ELCRA), prohibits an employer from failing or refusing to hire, discharge, or otherwise discriminate against an individual in employment because of weight. MCL 37.2202(1)(a).

But employees still must meet

Major world religionsOn May 17, 2017, attorneys for a corporation operating a Detroit funeral home that fired a transgender employee filed its appeal brief. The brief argues that the corporation could fire a transgender employee who refused to follow its sex-specific dress code because allowing her to wear women’s clothes at work would violate the religious

The saying, “you get what you pay for,” is cliché. But it is no less true. And it is an accurate cliché when it comes to online legal advice.

The Danger of Relying on Legal Advice from Free Q&A Websites

Various websites offer answers to legal questions from attorneys who register with the Q&A site

Employer Religious Freedom and LGBT RightsLast year we reported on an important LGBT case involving a Michigan corporation that fired a transgender female employee (EEOC v. R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc.). The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) argued Title VII’s ban on sex discrimination prohibits bias based on gender identity. The funeral home’s majority shareholder claimed