overly broad noncompete restrictionsUsing a broad brush to draft noncompete agreements that are applied universally to a company’s workforce is increasingly coming under fire. And this exposes companies to unnecessary litigation risks, as well as legal fees associated with enforcement costs.

Employer Abuse of Noncompete Restrictions

A recent example of involves Law360 and its settlement with the New

Trade Secret Misappropriation DecisionsA lawsuit involving trade secret misappropriation recently brought to mind the definition of a “knee-jerk reaction;” an “automatic and unthinking” response.

Specifically, our law firm filed a lawsuit for breach of contract involving unpaid commissions and other claims on behalf of a former executive. In response, the former employer manufactured filed a counter-claim for trade

Handcuff InnovationThe Wall Street Journal, by Aruna Viswanatha, recently asked whether Noncompete Agreements Hobble Junior Employees. Spoiler alert — they do. According to the Journal:

Noncompete agreements—common in computing and engineering jobs, where proprietary technology can be at stake—are spreading to other industries and stretching further down the corporate ladder. Labor-law experts say some

ToolboxWhen it comes to post employment restrictions, non-compete agreements often get all the attention. In fact, such restrictions are a frequent subject of discussion on our law firm’s blog (Noncompete Restrictions: The First Line of Defense for Protecting the Company from Unfair Competition).

However, as explained below, a carefully drafted non-solicitation provision should

shutterstock_84499888Business involves competition. But not all competition is lawful. Two former employees found this out the hard way after a judge determined on May 22, 2015 that they had wrongfully started a competing business while they continued to work for their employer along with misappropriating trade secrets and engaging in other wrongful acts (Nedschroef

Fog-&-Uncertainty.jpgA recent Delaware court case invalidating an employer’s non-compete agreement provides a cautionary reminder for companies with operations and employees in multiple states.

Specifically, in Ascension Ins. Holdings, LLC v. Underwood (Delaware, Jan. 28, 2015) the company, Ascension was incorporated in Delaware, but headquartered in California. California was also where the employee, Roberts Underwood worked.